Shaft

I have been trying to make the rather complex end plates for my aluminum frame reels (blog entry of 10 Aug 2011), but having serial failures. So I decided to take a break and make some really straightforward parts, the shafts.

It would be good to turn a shaft between centers because then the two journals would be exactly collinear. But the shaft for a fly reel is quite short, about 1.5 inches, and on the Sherline lathe the cross slide becomes trapped between the headstock and tailstock.
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The slide cannot be moved enough in the axial direction to do the turning.

So I clamp the shaft in a 4 jaw chuck, first by one end and then by the other.
IMG_3286
My “blanks” are a 2 piece brazed bronze assembly. (More on brazing in the 23 June 2011 blog posting.) This allows the shaft to be hollow and saves a lot of weight. I first carefully center the blank in the chuck (more on centering below).

Here the click end has been turned and the ratchet seat knurled.
IMG_3289

Now I re-chuck from the other end. I adjust the jaws while indicating on a surface that is already turned. It doesn’t seem like a great effort to get about 0.0004 TIR. The indicator is a “Last Word” by Starrett, purchased on Ebay. The dial divisions are 0.001 inch. A TIR of 0.0002 is readily observable.
IMG_3290

Here the crank end has been turned.
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The end is now tapped for the crank retaining screw.
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And flats are milled to carry crank torque.
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Here is a brazed blank and a finished part.
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This entry was posted in Alignment, Reel Parts, Shaft. Bookmark the permalink.

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